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Working across epidemics: comparing the acceptability of self-led testing options for HIV and hepatitis C virus among men who have sex with men and people who use drugs


Author
Witzel et al.

Publication year
2018

Country

Type of approach
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Type of assistance
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Specimen
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Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
87

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
HIV self-testing and self-sampling acceptability was explored in 6 focus group discussions with 47 men who have sex with men in London, Plymouth and Manchester and 17 stakeholder interviews. Acceptability of self-testing and self-sampling for Hepatitis C was explored in 3 focus group discussions with 18 people who inject drugs and 5 stakeholder interviews in London. Qualitative data were transcribed and emergent themes were compared.

Summary of findings
Self-led testing options for both HIV and Hepatitis C were valued by key populations for providing convenience and confidentiality. Stakeholders praised the opportunity to reach new populations and increase testing frequency. HIVST and self-testing for Hepatitis C gave a high degree of control to the user, although key populations perceived these tests to have lower sensitivity than tests in clinical settings, especially if using oral fluid. Seeking care following a positive result after remote testing for HIV was not considered problematic for men who have sex with men, although some participants reported concern about whether other self-testers would link to care.

Acceptability
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Acceptability details
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Willingness to pay
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Willingness to pay details
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Sensitivity
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Specificity
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Concordance
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HIV positivity
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Accuracy details
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Social harm
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Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
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Study status
Completed