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What should the ideal HIV self-test look like? A usability study of test prototypes in unsupervised HIV self-testing in Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa


Author
Peck et al.

Publication year
2014

Country
Multi-country

Type of approach
Dual

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood, Oral-fluid

Study population
Health-care workers: Health-care workers: Community-based mobilizers, provider referral, or study staff

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
150

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
n/a

Methodology
Conducted formative usability research with participants who were lay users naive to HIVST. Participants were given five HIVST kit prototypes (1 oral fluid-based test kit and 4 fingerstick kits). Participants were instructed to perform the HIV self-test with the materials supplied. No additional instructions or coaching was provided. Participants were video-recorded conducting unassisted HIVST; users were observed to identify errors and challenges with performing an HIV self-test and interpreting the panel result. Participants did not receive a test result, but interpreted standardized result panels. Then participants were interviewed about their opinions and experience.

Summary of findings
Errors were common among users, with less than 25% of participants conducting all steps correctly and 47.3% of participants performing multiple errors, particularly in sample collection and transfer. Participants also had difficulty interpreting results. Authors suggest that in order to address these issues, HIVST kits need pictorial instructions that are easy to understand, simple sample collection with integrated test components, fewer steps, and results that are easy to interpret.

Acceptability
0.9

Acceptability details
Willingness to test ranged from 83-90%.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
More than 80% of participants agreed that they were likely or very likely to use the test again if it were free and also indicated that they were willing to buy the test. Willingness to buy levels varied from 83% to 94%.

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
More than 80% of participants agreed that they were likely or very likely to use the test again if it were free and also indicated that they were willing to buy the test.

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed