Search HIVST

The association between intimate partner violence and women's distribution and use of HIV self-tests with male partners: evidence from a cohort study in Kenya


Author
Schaffer et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
Dual

Type of assistance
Directly assisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Mixed: Vulnerable population and key population: women receiving antenatal and post-partum care and their partners

Study design
Resource use

Sample size
162

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
5.9 [4.9 - 7.0]

Methodology
Study to determine whether intimate partner violence history was associated with couples self-testing having occurred rather than partner self-testing.

Summary of findings
162 participants provided complete follow-up information (162/176). Participants who did not provide complete follow-up information were excluded from analysis. Thirty-four participants (21%) experienced intimate partner violence in the 12 months prior to enrollment. For 18 participants (11%), their primary partner did not self-test during the follow-up period, while for 55 participants (34%) their partner self-tested, and for 89 participants (55%) the partner and the participant both self-tested (couples self-testing). Intimate partner violence history with one's primary partner reduced the likelihood of partner self-testing occurring (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.70; aOR 0.10, 95% CI 0.02-0.46) and of couples self-testing occurring (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.11-0.92; aOR 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.54).

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed