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Offering self-administered oral HIV testing as a choice to truck drivers in Kenya: predictors of uptake and need for guidance while self-testing


Author
Kelvin et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
Facility-based

Type of assistance
Directly assisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Vulnerable population: Truck drivers

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
149

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
5.9 [4.9 - 7.0]

Methodology
Assessed predictors of choosing self-administered oral HIV testing in the clinic with supervision versus the standard provider-administered blood test when offered; also assessed accuracy and correct performance.

Summary of findings
56.38% of participants chose the self-test, 23.49% the provider-administered test, and 20.13% refused testing. In the adjusted regression models, each additional unit on the fatalism and self-efficacy scales was associated with 0.97 (p = 0.003) and 0.83 (p = 0.008) times lower odds of choosing the self-test, respectively. Overall, 52.38% of self-testers did so correctly without questions, 47.61% asked questions, and 13.10% required unsolicited correction from the provider. Each additional unit on the fatalism scale was associated with 1.07 times higher odds of asking for guidance when self-testing (p < 0.001).

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed