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Motivations for and implications of using home HIV tests among Australian gay men


Author
Bavinton et al.

Publication year
2014

Country

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
567

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
In 2012, participants completed an online national survey Thinking About eXposure to Infection: Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs (TAXI-KAB) of Australian gay men.

Summary of findings
Participants reported that they avoided or delayed conventional HIV testing because of inconvenience of current clinic-based testing, privacy concerns, and the belief that they had not engaged in risky behaviors. Nearly half (47%) reported that if they had the capacity to self-test they would test more often. 70.8% said they were likely or very likely to self-test if HIVST was available in Australia. 1.6% already accessed HIVST before legalization in Australia through online purchase. 36.1% of participants did not know how long they would need to wait after exposure before detection by HIVST, 12% of participants erroneously believed they could test within a week of being infected.

Acceptability
0.708

Acceptability details
70.8% said they would likely self-test if HIVST was available in Australia (n=n/a).

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed