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Insights into potential users and messaging for HIV oral self-test kits in Kenya


Author
Ochako et al.

Publication year
2014

Country

Type of approach
Dual

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Mixed: General population and key population: men who have sex with men and female sex workers

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
982

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
5.9 [4.9 - 7.0]

Methodology
A mixed-method study to identify the willingness to use oral self-test kits, and factors associated with the potential adoption and use of oral HIV self-testing kits to inform future HIV self-testing pilot programs.

Summary of findings
Self-testing should be introduced and carefully evaluated for the general and key populations in Kenya. The levels of interest and intention to use self-test kits were overwhelmingly high among the general populations and female sex workers. The intention to use self-test kits among men who have sex with men was lower, likely due to the convenient sampling of only out (more openly gay) men who have sex with men at drop-in-centers. Further study with probability sampling might be needed for this group. Detailed findings are present regarding how self-testing should be implemented.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
Nearly all respondents in the general population in both study locations, and among female sex workers report a willingness to use the kit and test on their own. However, only 57% of men who have sex with men were willing to use the kit and test on their own.

Willingness to pay
US$ 0.96-1.44

Willingness to pay details
Willingness to pay was almost universal among the general population and female sex workers, but was much lower among men who have sex with men respondents. Past testing experience positively influenced willingness to pay for self-test kits.

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
Men who have sex with men: 50 % would seek post-test counseling and confirmation of results and female sex workers: 75 % would go to a health facility for confirmation

Source
3IE

Study status
Completed