Search HIVST

Information, motivation, and behavioral skills of high-risk young adults to use the HIV self-test


Author
Brown et al.

Publication year
2016

Country
USA

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Young people: Young people (18-24 years)

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
21

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Participants engaged in a think-aloud protocol, video observations, questionnaires, and in-depth interviews to examine use of HIVST. Participants were observed by a research team member while using an oral fluid-based test and interpreting the result. Participants were unassisted by the researcher, only using the instructions included in the HIVST kit. Following self-testing, participants completed a questionnaire and in-depth interview on their HIVST experience.

Summary of findings
Results were organized by the IMB model: information, motivation, and behavioral skills. The questionnaire found below average knowledge of HIVST among young people. Few had ever heard of HIVST, but those who did know of HIVST heard about it from television, social media, or from professional involvement in health care. Motivations supporting HIVST use included: approval of peers or family, not needing to visit the clinic, fast results, easy access, privacy, and use in non-monogamous relationships. For behavioral skills related to HIVST, participants strongly indicated that they could: use the HIVST correctly, understand the results, talk about using HIVST with a potential partner, and say no to sex if their partner refused to test. Participants were less certain they could talk a partner into using HIVST before they have sexual intercourse. Participants felt least confident in their ability to use the HIVST if drinking alcohol, indicating substance use could be a barrier to HIVST use.

Acceptability
0.904

Acceptability details
Most participants (90.4%), said they would definitely use the HIVST kit (57.1 %) or that it was likely (33.3 %). Similarly, most participants responded that they would definitely use HIVST to test any sexual partners (57.1 %) or with intimate partners (28%)

Willingness to pay
US$ 20

Willingness to pay details
When asked how much they would be willing to spend to purchase an HIVS kit, most participants indicated they would not spend more than US$20.

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed