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Increasing testing and diagnosis for men who have sex with men using social networks for HIV self-test distribution


Author
Lightfoot et al.

Publication year
2017


Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TG)

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
110

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
African American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (N=31), between 18 and 45 years old were engaged and trained as peer recruiters on the basics of HIV infection, proper use of the oral fluid-based HIVST, and supporting a friend through the testing process. Each peer was given five self-test kits to distribute to MSM friends thought not to have tested for HIV in at least 6 months. Those receiving the self-test kits were asked to complete an online survey after completing their test.

Summary of findings
Peers distributed self-test kits to 143 social and sexual network members, of whom 110 completed the online survey. Compared to men who have sex with men who utilized the government-sponsored testing programs, individuals reached through the peer-based self-testing strategy were significantly more likely to have never tested for HIV (4.0% vs. 0.5%, p<0.01) and to report a positive test result (3.7% vs 1.5%, p<0.01), though six people in the peer-based strategy (5.5%) declined to provide a result.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
6.1% (7/116)

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed