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Increased HIV testing will modestly reduce HIV incidence among gay men in New South Wales and would be acceptable if HIV testing becomes convenient


Author
Gray et al.

Publication year
2013

Country

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: HIV-negative men who have sex with men

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
324

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
This study assessed whether increases in HIV testing would be acceptable to men who have sex with men in New South Wales, Australia through an online survey and focus group discussions. The study also modeled the potential impact of increases in testing coverage and/or frequency using an individual-based model of HIV transmission. In the survey and focus groups, participants were asked about their preferred methods of HIV testing, including HIVST.

Summary of findings
The study found that an increase in HIV testing alone is unlikely to reduce HIV incidence substantially in men who have sex with men (MSM) in New South Wales (NSW). However, the relatively high testing levels need to continue to prevent an increase in HIV infections. Successful treatment as prevention interventions will require increases in testing rates; such increases would be acceptable to MSM in NSW, as long as testing is convenient and results are easily communicated. Participants responded to different HIV testing options, including HIVST. Of the participants who responded to the survey question on HIVST, 34% found HIVST 'much more preferable', 23% found HIVST 'more preferable' and 14% found it 'about the same' as other testing options. Only 28% of respondents found HIVST less preferable.

Acceptability
0.572

Acceptability details
Of those who responded on the survey, 57.2% of men who have sex with men said HIVST would be 'more preferable' or 'much more preferable' as an HIV testing option.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a

Source

Study status
Completed