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Implications of the online market for regulation and uptake of HIV self-testing in Australia


Author
Williams et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood, Oral-fluid

Study population
HIVST kits: HIVST kits available for purchase online

Study design
Resource use

Sample size
14

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Researchers searched forHIVST kits available for purchase from distributors online. Kits were purchased and assessed against a structured extraction tool based on Australian HIV testing clinical performance guidelines.

Summary of findings
In total, eight different HIV self-test kits were purchased from seven different distributors. Analysis revealed that none of the test kits met guidelines established for home testing. Websites often gave inconsistent information, advertising a different product from the one received. Two kits were expired upon arrival and another two were different from the product advertised and ordered. Six of the eight kits came with instructions for use that included diagrams, however usefulness of the instructions was questionable. Simple generic advice for what to do if you receive a reactive test result was printed on 86% of kits, but no kits included Australia-specific post-test information regarding linkage to services or counseling. Prices for the kits ranged from AUS$15.40 to AUS$77.00 per item and postage.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
Simple generic advice for what to do if you receive a reactive test result was printed on 86% of kits, but no kits included Australia-specific post-test information regarding linkage to services or counseling.

Source

Study status
Completed