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I think it is right: acceptability of an HIV self-test by lay users in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa


Author
Knight et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood, Oral-fluid

Study population
General population: General population: lay users

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
50

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
n/a

Methodology
Post-test quantitative assessment examined acceptability, ease of and confidence with use, future use of a test if available and/or free, and willingness to buy. The study also used in-depth qualitative interviews to explore what people liked about the self-test and why, their willingness to recommend it, and how much they would pay for a test.

Summary of findings
Regardless of prototype and problems with test use, participants reported self-test was easy (80%) and qualitative responses were very positive. Reasons for liking self-testing included privacy and autonomy, removing the barriers presented by the clinic, and ensured confidentiality. Majority of participants said they would self-test again if it were free (98%), with most being willing to buy a test (86%). Some stated better instructions for use are needed, as well as more usable tests.

Acceptability
0.98

Acceptability details
98% of participants (n=n/a) would conduct the test again if it were free

Willingness to pay
US$ 2.12-10.60

Willingness to pay details
Most participants were willing to buy a test (86%). Participants suggested that acceptable suggested price was R$3 (US$ 2.12).

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed