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I know that I do have HIV but nobody saw me: oral HIV self-testing in an informal settlement in South Africa


Author
Martinez-Perez et al.

Publication year
2016

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Directly assisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Mixed: Health-care workers and clients

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
20

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
19.2 [18.4 - 20.0]

Methodology
Mixed methods study using formative qualitative study and pilot implementation of HIVST at the Wellness Hub (offering HIVST to all clents who refused standard clinic-based HIV testing). Aim of the study was to assess uptake and linkage to care among those offered HIVST by Hub counsellor.

Summary of findings
20 participants (clients and staff) were included in the qualitative research. Participants reported fear, public image (stigma / discrimination), and lack of trust were deterrents to HIV testing. HIV self-testing was found to be acceptable, but participants noted instructions in local language would be useful and that pre- and post-test counseling is needed. Men were suggested to have the greatest interest in and benefit most from HIVST. Youth were also perceived to benefit from HIVST.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
Participants did not believe coercive testing would be more likely with self-testing than with HTS. Consensus was reached that violent events would not necessarily be more frequent with home O-HIVST than following clinic-based HTS.

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a

Source

Study status
Completed