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How do people experience negotiating HIV-related online and remote testing resources?


Author
Gibbs et al.

Publication year
2018

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
n/a

Study population
Mixed: General population and men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
28

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
Think-aloud and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 individuals selected using community convenience sampling. Participants were from a range of ethnicities, 36% female, 57% men who have sex with men and ranged in age from 25-69 years. Some participants had previously accessed online information about HIV self-testing or conducted HIVST or HIV self-sampling. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Study period: April to August 2018.

Summary of findings
Participants highlighted the importance of having a trusted source of information and found the way information was presented in HIV-related online and remote testing resources did not meet their needs. Participants identified challenges in choosing the right test, and also expressed the need for support preparing for a test and the potential result. Although participants liked the rapidity of HIVST, they believed there was a lack of information about interpreting the test and little supportive advice if the result was reactive.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed