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HIV testing preferences among long distance truck drivers in Kenya: a discrete choice experiment


Author
Strauss et al

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Other: Truck drivers

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
305

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
5.9 [4.9 - 7.0]

Methodology
This study conducted a discrete choice experiment and examined truck drivers' choices regarding HIV counselling and testing among 305 truck drivers recruited from two roadside wellness clinics along major trucking routes in Kenya. Participants made trade-offs between characteristics of HIV testing service delivery models by making hypothetical choices in a series of paired HIV testing scenarios. Conditional logit models were used to identify the HIV testing characteristics driving the selection of preferred scenarios, as well as to determine whether preferences interact with individual characteristics, especially HIV testing history. Participants preferred free, provider-administered HIV testing at a roadside clinic, using a finger-prick test, with in-person counselling, undertaken in the shortest possible time. The strongest driver of choice was the cost of the test.

Summary of findings
Reducing testing time to 20 min was the only characteristic that significantly increased the odds of testing (OR=1.172, p=0.034). Participants that had never tested were significantly more likely to prefer oral self-testing over a finger-prick test (OR=1.598, p=0.009), while those that had tested were indifferent between an oral and finger-prick test. Regular testers were indifferent to service delivery characteristics for every attribute except time and money, with the odds of choosing a three-hour test significantly lower than a 90-minute test (OR=0.695, p<0.001) and a test with even a small cost significantly less preferable than a free test (US$2.50 OR=0.579, p<0.001; US$3.00 OR=0.381, p<0.001). For non-regular testers, all significant preferences favoured the baseline test, with in-person counselling preferred over telephonic counselling (OR=0.733, p<0.001); testing at a roadside clinic preferred over testing at home (OR=0.693, p=0.003), a clinic near home (OR=0.736, p=0.031) or company office (OR=0.615, p<0.001) with a free test preferred over one they would have to pay for (US$2.50 OR=0.509, p<0.001; US$3.00 OR=0.279, p<0.001).

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a

Source

Study status
Completed