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HIV testing practices and the potential role of HIV self-testing among men who have sex with men in Mexico


Author
Oldenburg et al.

Publication year
2016

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
4537

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.3]

Methodology
The objective of this study was to characterize HIV testing practices among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Mexico and intention to use HIV self-testing. In 2012, members of one of the largest social/sexual networking websites forMSM in Latin America completed an anonymous online survey. This analysis was restricted to HIV-uninfected MSM residing in Mexico. Multivariable logistic regression models were fit to assess factors associated with HIV testing and intention to use an HIV self-test.

Summary of findings
Of 4537 respondents, 70.9% reported ever having an HIV test, of whom 75.5% reported testing at least yearly. The majority (94.3%) indicated that they would use an HIV home self-test if it were available. Participants identifying as bisexual less often reported ever HIV testing compared to those identifying as gay/homosexual (adjusted odds ratio=0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.44-0.62). Having a physical exam in the past year was associated with increased ever HIV testing (adjusted odds ratio=4.35, 95% confidence interval 3.73-5.07), but associated with decreased interest in HIV self-testing (adjusted odds ratio=0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.89).

Acceptability
0.943

Acceptability details
The majority (94.3%) indicated that they would use an HIV home self-test if it were available.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed