Search HIVST

HIV testing practices and interest in self-testing options among young, black men who have sex with men in North Carolina


Author
Hurt et al.

Publication year
2016

Country
USA

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men and transgender women

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
212

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Young black men who have sex with men answer an electronic survey to understand testing behaviors and determine awareness and use of HIV self-testing in North Carolina.

Summary of findings
3% (n=7/212) of participants were transgender women. 77% (n=164/212) were aware that HIVST was available; 17% (n=35/212) had ever purchased rapid (n=27) or dried blood spot-based kits (n=14). Participants aware of HIVST kits (n=164) had greater intention to test in the next 6 months (p=0.04); were more likely to consistently have sufficient income for basic necessities (p<0.001); more likely to ask sex partners about their HIV status (p=0.003); less likely to have a main sex partner (p=0.03) or to have ever had transactional sex (p=0.013). Among 142 participants at least somewhat likely to buy a self-test kit in the future, convenience (35%), privacy protection (23%); and rapid delivery of results (18%) were the most frequently cited motivations.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
Willingness to buy an HIVST in the future was reported by 142 participants and convenience (35%), privacy protection (23%), and rapid delivery of results (18%) were the most frequently cited motivations.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed