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HIV self-testing practices among health-care workers: feasibility and options for accelerating HIV testing services in Ethiopia


Author
Kedebe et al.

Publication year
2013

Country

Type of approach
Facility-based

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Health-care workers: health-care workers: medical doctors, health officers, nurses, midwives, laboratory technicians, pharmacists, and internship students

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
307

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
1.14

Methodology
Cross-sectional study design triangulated with qualitative methods (a semi-structured questionnaire and in-depth interview).

Summary of findings
This study found a high rate of HIVST practice among health-care workers. Despite not being legally allowed, 70% of those who had ever tested had tested themselves (203/288). 80% of all participants expressed interested in self-testing (244/288). The main reason stated for self-testing was the need for confidentiality for the test result, which was mentioned by 205 participants (82%).

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
Self-testing practices were more common in private health facilities followed by government hospitals, where (85.2%) and (69.6%) of health-care workers tested for HIV by themselves, respectively.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed