Search HIVST

HIV self-testing: feasibility and acceptability of a large scale national service


Author
James et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
3021

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.19

Methodology
After online orders, HIVST kits were distributed to men who have sex with men and black Africans living in the UK. The service was promoted through social media. Participants were invited to complete a survey that collected demographic information, contact details and answers to HIV risk assessment questions. Study period: 24 June-5 Aug 2016.

Summary of findings
A total of 4879 kits were ordered. 3021 people (62%) informed us of their result. 19% had never had an HIV test before and a further 37% had last tested >1 year ago. 68% reported condomless anal sex in the previous 3 months with 28% reporting this with 2 or more partners. 28 people (0.92%) reported a reactive result. Three (10.7%) people already knew they were HIV-positive and one result was confirmed as a false positive. Of the remaining 24 all were men who have sex with men. 15/24 (62.5%) identified as white British. Contact was made with 22 (92%) individuals, all of whom had accessed confirmatory testing and HIV services. 602 people responded to the survey. 98% would use the service again, 91% felt self-testing encouraged them to test, and 91% were happy with the support they received.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
98% (589/602) would use the service again.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
0.92% (28/3021)

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
92% (22/28) had accessed confirmatory testing and HIV services, and three participants were know HIV-positives.


Study status
Completed