Search HIVST

HIV self-testing could revolutionize testing in South Africa, but it has got to be done properly: perceptions of key stakeholders


Author
Makusha et al.

Publication year
2015

Country

Type of approach
Dual

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
n/a

Study population
Health-care workers: Health-care workers

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
12

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
19.2 [18.4 - 20.0]

Methodology
In-depth qualitative interviews (N = 12) with key stakeholders were conducted from June to August 2013 in South Africa. Interviews explored: interest in HIVST; potential distribution channels for HIVST kits to target groups; perception of requirements for diagnostic technologies that would be most amenable to HIVST; and opinions on barriers and opportunities for HIV-linkage to care after receiving positive test results.

Summary of findings
While there is currently no HIVST policy in South Africa, and several barriers exist, participants in the study expressed enthusiasm and willingness for scale-up and noted an urgent need for further research, planning, establishment of an HIVST policy, and programming to complement existing facility-based and community-based HIV testing systems. Introduction of HIVST could have far-reaching positive effects on holistic HIV testing uptake, giving people autonomy to decide which approach they want to use for HIV testing, early diagnosis, treatment, and care for HIV, particularly among hard-to-reach groups, including men.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a

Source

Study status
Completed