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HIV self-test distribution increases test frequency in South African MSM


Author
Lippman et al.

Publication year
2018

Country

Type of approach
Facility-based

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood, Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
127

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
Participants were given a five self-test kits of their choice (oral fluid or blood-based) at baseline and an additional four kits at a three month visit to explore acceptability, feasibility, utilization and distribution patterns, and to understand how HIVST might expand testing frequency among men who have sex with men. Participants were asked to use the kits themselves at least one time and to distribute the other kits to their networks. To assess changes in frequency of testing (every six months) researchers used generalized estimating equations. Study period: June 2015 and May 2017.

Summary of findings
91%(n=116/127) of participants self-tested and reported willingnes to self-test again. 80%(n=n/a) participants preferred blood-based tests and 45% (n=n/a) preferred oral fluid tests. At three month visit returning participants (n=n/a) distributed 728 HIVST, 18.5%(n=134/728) to sexual partners, 51.6% (n=376/728) to friends and 29.8% (217/728) to family. Among those testing, 32%(n=37/116) reported testing with someone else present and 24%(n=28/116) reported testing at the same time as the other person. Six participants seroconverted during the study period, 40 new diagnoses were reported among self-testers. Frequency of testing increased from 37.8% prior to the study to 84.5% at follow up(p<0.1), and participants reported anticipated regular testing of 100% if HIVST were available compared to 84% if only clinic-testing were available in the coming year (p<0.01).

Acceptability
0.91

Acceptability details
91%(n=116/127) of participants self-tested

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a