Search HIVST

HIV care-seeking behaviour after HIV self-testing among men who have sex with men in Beijing, China: a cross-sectional study


Author
Ren et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
n/a

Study population
Key population: Key population: men who have sex with men

Study design
Resource use

Sample size
2383

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
A cross-sectional study design was used and an online survey was conducted in Beijing, China in 2016, among users of a popular Chinese gay networking smart phone application. Chi-square test was used to compare characteristics of those who sought HIV care (“seekers”) and those who did not (“non-seekers”). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess factors associated with HIV care seeking.

Summary of findings
2383 participants were included in the study, from a total of 21,785 user who clicked on the survey link. 15.9% participants (380/2383) reported seeking HIV care after HIV self-testing while 84.1% (2003/2383) did not. Lack of knowledge of the window period (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47–0.97, p 0.04) was associated with reduced odds of seeking HIV care, while lower monthly income (AOR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.03–1.62, p 0.03) and obtaining HIV self-testing kits from health facilities (AOR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.81–3.17, p< 0.001), and non-governmental organizations (AOR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.79–3.34, p< 0.001) were associated with increased odds of seeking HIV care. Among those who sought HIV care, a large majority (92.4%) had non-reactive HIV self-testing results. 10.9% (29/265) with reactive, uncertain, or unknown results sought HIV care.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
15.9% (380/2383) reported seeking HIV care after HIV self-testing while 84.1% (2003/2383) did not.


Study status
Completed