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Getting HIV self-test kits into the home for young African-American MSM in Los Angeles: A qualitative report


Author
Daniels et al.

Publication year
2018

Country
USA

Type of approach
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Type of assistance
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Specimen
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Study population
Key population: Young, African-American men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
21

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
Between June 2014 and January 2015, two focus group discussions with young, African-American men who have sex with men were conducted to understand participant perceptions of barriers and facilitators for HIV self-testing in the home. Participants were recruited by purposive sampling at a community center in Los Angeles for young men who have sex with men of color. Participants were eligible to participate in focus groups if they lived in Los Angeles, spoke English, identified as African-American men who have sex with men, and were between 18 to 35 years old.

Summary of findings
Two themes emerged from the findings of the focus groups: (1) engaging community through leadership and (2) addressing family communication. Participants felt that community leadership could help share inclusive, culturally-specific messaging about HIV testing, and thus reduce stigma of testing. Participants felt concerned that an HIV self-test kit would be found by their family members or that gossip would reach their family that they had purchased a kit, issues which negatively-impacted participant acceptance of HIV self-testing. However, it was also felt that community leaders could assist in explaining the benefits of HIV self-testing to families.

Acceptability
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Acceptability details
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Willingness to pay
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Willingness to pay details
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Sensitivity
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Specificity
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Concordance
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HIV positivity
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Accuracy details
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Social harm
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Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
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