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Gay and bisexual men's views on rapid self-testing for HIV


Author
Bilardi et al.

Publication year
2013

Country

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
31

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Participants were recruited from two sites, a sexual health clinic and a community-based organization providing services to people living with and affected by HIV in the gay community. 31 men who have sex with men were shown a sample of an oral fluid-based test and instructed on its use, reliability, and availability. Participants were not tested. Participants were then interviewed on their past knowledge or experience with HIVST, their likely use of rapid tests, advantages and disadvantages of HIVST, the potential for HIVST to change their sexual practices, potential supports for users of HIVST, cost, and availability of HIVST.

Summary of findings
Only 6 study participants had ever heard of HIVST, with two men who have sex with men (MSM) having previously self-tested overseas. Barriers to conventional testing include perception of being low-risk and the inconvenience of visiting a health center. The majority of men supported the introduction of rapid self-testing, and would be likely to, or would use the tests for home use. However, most reported they would use them for interim testing and not to replace conventional blood testing at health services as they could not detect other sexually transmitted infections or provide the professional expertise and support provided at health services. Participants indicated that they would not alter their sexual practices with the availability of HIVST, including not using the kits for partner sero-sorting or engaging in condomless anal intercourse. MSM stated they would like to access HIVST in the community and would be willing to pay US$7.50-$15.00 for a kit.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
The majority of men supported the introduction of self-testing, or would be willing to use the self-tests (n=n/a).

Willingness to pay
US$7.50-$16 (A$ 10-20)

Willingness to pay details
Men who have sex with men stated they would be willing to pay USD 7.50-16.00 for a kit (n=n/a). Many participants indicated the price of the HIVST kit should be similar to the price of a pregnancy test.

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed