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Fingerprick versus oral swab: acceptability of blood-based testing increases if other STIs can be detected


Author
Balan et al.

Publication year
2017


Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood, Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
82

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Participants were recruited through online dating websites and at gay-oriented venues. Participants indicated their preference for oral swab versus blood-based HIV rapid tests on a computer-assisted self-interview (CASI). The CASI included questions about demographics, sexual practices, substance use, HIV testing history, and self-efficacy of using HIV self-tests with a partner. Participants were shown both oral and blood-based HIV rapid tests and asked to rate their likelihood of using each test if they cost the same or if one cost half the price of the other. The likelihood to use each test was analyzed using paired t-tests. The association of likelihood of use with potential covariates was analyzed using Pearson correlations, ANOVAs and t-tests.

Summary of findings
On average, participants reported a lower mean likelihood of using the blood-based fingerprick test (4.99, SD = 3.53) as compared with the oral fluid swab (9.33, SD = 1.83) when the tests were assumed to cost the same (p<.001). A hypothetical savings of half the cost of the test boosted the blood-based test likelihood of use to a mean of 6.11 (SD = 3.48), and the possibility of obtaining results in half the time raised the mean likelihood of use to 6.35 (SD = 3.62). The possibility of diagnosing other sexually-transmitted infections along with HIV in one rapid blood-based test increased the mean likelihood of use to 8.10 (SD = 2.96). 60% of respondents indicated that they were extremely likely to use a blood-based test that also diagnosed other sexually-transmitted infections.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
Acceptability of the oral fluid HIV self-test was higher than acceptability for use of a blood-based HIV self-test, although acceptability increased if the blood-based test cost half the price of the oral test and if the blood-based test could also test for other sexually-transmitted infections.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed