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Feasibility and acceptability of HIV self-testing among pre-exposure prophylaxis users in Kenya


Author
Ngure et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
Facility-based

Type of assistance
Directly assisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
General population: PrEP users

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
222

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
5.9 [4.9 - 7.0]

Methodology
Demonstration pilot using mixed methods to to prospectively study HIV self-testing behaviours among HIV-uninfected persons at the Thika, Kenya site. Interviewer-administered questionnaires collecting information about use, social harm, and values and preferences related to HIVST were performed in each quarterly visit. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted using semi-structured guides. Study period: November 2013 to June 2015.

Summary of findings
Uptake of HIVST was high, 98% (222/226) of HIV-uninfected persons who were offered accepted self-testing. Nearly all (96.8%) reported that using the self-testing kit was easy. More than half (54.5%) reportedly did not share the HIV results from HIVST with anyone and almost all (98.7%) the participants did not share the HIV self-testing kits with anyone. Many participants reported that HIV self-testing was empowering and reduced anxiety associated with waiting between clinic HIV tests.

Acceptability
0.98

Acceptability details
264 participants were eligible for the HIV self-testing sub-study, of whom 226 were approached and 222 (98.2%) enrolled.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
There were no intended social harms (including physical, psychological, social, and economic) reported as a consequence of conducting the HIV self-testing or sharing the test results.

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed