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Experiences and correlates of HIV self-testing among men who have sex with men in Jiangsu Province, China


Author
Yan et al.

Publication year
2014

Country

Type of approach
Dual

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
522

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
<0.1

Methodology
A cross-sectional survey was conducted among men who have sex with men in Jiangsu from November 2013 to January 2014. Participants were recruited through time-location sampling and from online. Participants were asked a series of questions about HIV self-testing uptake and associated experiences. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of having ever self-tested for HIV.

Summary of findings
Of 522 participants, 26.2% had ever self-tested. Fingerstick was the most common self-testing modality (86.1%). A majority of participants reported that it was 'very easy' (43.1 %) or 'somewhat easy' (34.3%) to perform self-testing while lower proportions reported 'very confident' (24.1%) or 'somewhat confident' (36.5%) in the accuracy of their test results. Having ever self-tested was significantly associated with having had 2-5 and 6 or more male anal sex partners in the past 6 months (aOR 2.12, 95% CI 1.00-4.49; aOR 4.95, 95% CI 1.9-12.87), having ever tested for HIV (aOR 4.56, 95% CI 1.6-12.55), and having a friend or friends who self-tested (aOR 7.32, 95% CI 3.57-15.00).

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed