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Comparing uptake and acceptability of online self-sampling and self-testing for HIV


Author
Baraitser et al.

Publication year
2018

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood

Study population
General population: n/a

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
1466

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
In November 2017, a choice of free HIV self-testing or HIV self-sampling was offered to all individuals over 18 years in Great Britain through an online service. Self-testers were prompted to text their test results and self-samplers were contacted by text or phone with their test results. All users completed an evaluation questionnaire.

Summary of findings
Of 1,466 kits dispatched, 67% (n=984) chose HIVST and 33% (n=482) chose self-sampling. Response rates in both groups were similar; 57% (n=563) of self-testers texted back results and 57% (n=260) of self-samplers returned a blood test. There were no new HIV diagnoses. Groups that selected HIVST and self-sampling were similar in age, sex, ethnicity, sexuality, recent risk of HIV, symptoms and recent use of sexual health services. The evaluation questionnaire had a 28% (233/823) response rate; 32% (179/563) of self-testers and 21% (54/260) of self-samplers. Most self-testers chose this method because they valued the immediate result (62%, 110/179). 85% of self-testers and 94% of self-samplers felt sufficiently supported. Self-testers were more confident in the accuracy of their results (97% vs. 80%). Most users scored the service 5 out of 5 (89%, n=208/233) and would use their chosen method again (97%, 227/233).

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
67% (984/1466) of participants chose HIVST over self-sampling. Most users scored the service 5 out of 5 (89%, n=208/233) and would use their chosen method again (97%, 227/233).

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed