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Characteristics associated with HIV self-testing reported by internet-recruited men who have sex with men in the United States, eSTAMP baseline data, 2015


Author
Chavez et al.

Publication year
2017

Country
USA

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood, Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Trials

Sample size
2665

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
From Mar 25 to Aug 4, 2015, men who have sex with men reporting unknown or HIV-negative status were recruited online into a 12-month randomised controlled trial of HIVST. Before randomisation all participants completed an online survey. Using these data, participant characteristics were examined to calculated frequency and associations of past 12 months HIV self-testing with selected sociodemographic characteristics.

Summary of findings
Among 2665 participants [32% 18-24 years; 58% white; 43% with college degree; 84% employed; 23% < $20K household income; 63% had anal sex with 2 or more male partners, past 3 months; 6% had condomless anal sex with an HIV-infected male partner, past 3 months] 59% tested for HIV in the past year, 17% tested 3 times in the past year, and 70% had heard of HIVST. 10% (259) who reported HIVST in the past year, 92% used OraQuick In Home HIV Test, and 61% acquired other HIVST kits from a pharmacy. Convenience and privacy were the most common reasons for HIVST, 61% and 52%, respectively. Overall, awareness about HIVST was high among men who had sex with men (MSM), but few reported self-testing in the past year. MSM who engage in HIV sexual risk behaviors may have been earlier HIVST adopters. HIVST was positively associated with higher socioeconomic status, possibly due to test cost in the US (approximately $40).

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed