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Can women safely distribute oral HIVST kits to their sexual partners? Results from a pilot study in Kenya


Author
Agot et al.

Publication year
2016

Country

Type of approach
Dual

Type of assistance
Directly assisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Mixed: Key population and healthcare workers: sex workers, attendees at antenatal and postnatal clinics

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
280

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
5.9 [4.9 - 7.0]

Methodology
HIV-negative female sex workers (FSW) and antenatal clinic (ANC) and postnatal clinic (PNC) attendees were enrolled at multiple sites in Kisumu, Kenya. Women who self-reported a concern about experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) were excluded. FSWs were given 5 oral fluid-based self-tests while ANC and PNC attendees were given 3 self-tests. Study staff demonstrated how to use self-tests and each self-test included pictorial usage instructions (directly-assisted and unobserved by research staff). Women were also counseled to use their discretion and assess IPV risk when determining whether to introduce self-tests to their sexual partners. At 3 months, women were asked about self-test usage as well as experience of IPV and its relation to distribution of self-tests.

Summary of findings
280 women were enrolled and the majority (95% female sex workers (FSW), 93% antenatal care (ANC) attendees and 86% postnatal care (PNC) attendees) reported distributing self-tests to their primary sexual partner. Reported intimate partner violence (IPV) during 12 months before enrollment was 44%, 27% and 46% among FSW, ANC and PNC women, respectively. At follow-up, 13% of ANC, 16% of PNC and 21% of FSW reported IPV in the 3 months since study enrollment. However, the vast majority (85%) of women reporting IPV at follow-up had also reported IPV at baseline and only four of the women attributed the occurrence of IPV to distribution or attempted distribution of self-tests.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
At follow-up, 13% of antenatal care attendees, 16% of postnatal care attendees, and 21% of female sex workers reported inter-partner violence (IPV) in the 3 months since study enrollment. However, the vast majority (85%) of women reporting IPV at follow-up had also reported IPV at baseline and only four of the women attributed the of IPV to distribution or attempted distribution of self-tests.

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed