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Can home-based HIV rapid testing reduce HIV disparities among African Americans in Miami?


Author
Kenya et al.

Publication year
2016

Country
USA

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Both

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
General population: African-American general population

Study design
Trials

Sample size
60

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
Randomised controlled trial conducted between October and November 2013. Eligible participants self-identified as African American, had not completed an HIV test within the prior 12 months, were between 18 and 60 years of age, lived in the Overtown neighborhood of Miami, and were not known to be HIV positive. Community Health Workers administered a survey and pre-test counseling to eligible participants. Participants were randomised to unassisted or directly-assisted oral HIV self-testing groups.

Summary of findings
The vast majority of participants (98.3%, n=58) found the HIV self-test (HIVST) instructions easy to read and believed HIVST should be offered in the community (96.7%, n=n/a). Two participants in the assisted HIVST group were found HIV-positive and successfully linked to care. Three participants in the unassisted HIVST group were found HIV-positive, but did not link to care. The successful completion rate of all participants who were tested, and if HIV positive linked to care, was 100% (n=30) in the experimental condition (assisted HIVST with community health worker), and 83% (n=n/a) in the control condition (unassisted HIVST). This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.02).

Acceptability
0.967

Acceptability details
The majority of participants believed HIVST should be offered in the community (96.7%, n=n/a).

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
8% (n=5/62)

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
100% (n=2/2) linkage to care in the assisted HIVST group, 0% (n=0/3) linkage to care in the unassisted group.


Study status
Completed