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Australian men who have sex with men prefer rapid oral HIV testing over conventional blood testing for HIV


Author
Chen et al.

Publication year
2010

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
172

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Men who have sex with men attending two gay community events in Victoria in 2009 were invited to take part in a project where they received rapid testing for syphilis and were also asked to complete an anonymous questionaire that sought their views on rapid testing for syphilis and HIV. Men were asked about their preferred method of HIV testing, their likelihood of using rapid testing in a clinical or home-based setting (HIV self-testing), and if they would be likely to test more frequently if such testing was available. Responses were presented on 5-point Likert scales and men were asked to provide a reason for their preferences.

Summary of findings
When asked about which HIV test they would prefer in a clinic setting, 64% indicated a preference for rapid oral HIV testing and 74% indicated that if rapid oral HIV testing was available at a clinic they would test for HIV more frequently. If rapid oral HIV testing was available for home self-testing, 63% of men indicated it would be likely they would test themselves for HIV and 61% indicated they would test more frequently. Overall, men who have sex with men expressed a preference for rapid oral HIV testing and would test more frequently if testing was available for clinic or home use (self-testing) in Australia.

Acceptability
0.63

Acceptability details
63%(104/166) of men who have sex with men indicated they would be likely to self-test for HIV if HIVST was available.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed