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Attitudes about rapid, over-the-counter HIV home-testing kits among couples comprised of men who have sex with men


Author
Chakravarty et al.

Publication year
2014

Country
USA

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men, concordant HIV negative and serodiscordant couples

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
310

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Cohort study of men who have sex with men couples conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area between August, 2012 and November, 2013. 310 couples (242 concordant negative, 68 serodiscordant) completed a computerized survey about relationship dynamics and attitudes towards HIV testing.

Summary of findings
One-quarter of the sample had never heard of HIVST and 36% were not at all likely to use it to screen an outside partner prior to having sex with him. Among HIVST-aware HIV-negative men, 56% considered HIVST an extremely good idea, but only 21% were extremely likely to use it. If an HIVST result were HIV-negative, most (81%) would be a little to extremely likely to disclose a broken agreement to their primary partner. The availability of HIVST is not universal knowledge among men who have sex with men (MSM) couples and many are unlikely to use it themselves or to screen outside sexual partners. But HIVST has the potential to overcome barriers to HIV testing and to encourage men to disclose broken agreements with their primary partner, thereby facilitating discussions about HIV prevention and reducing overall transmission risk. These findings highlight the need to recognize impediments to the uptake of HIVST in order to effectively promote this promising technology to increase HIV testing rates among MSM couples.

Acceptability
0.21

Acceptability details
56% of HIVST-aware HIV-negative men who have sex with men considred HIVST an extremely good idea, but only 21% were likely to use it.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed