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Are women more likely to self-test? A short report from an acceptability study of the HIV self-testing kit in South Africa


Author
Spyrelis et al.

Publication year
2016

Country

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
Unassisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
General population: Men and women

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
118

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
19.2 [18.4 - 20.0]

Methodology
Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted in order to assess the acceptability of the HIVST kit. Respondent groups were segmented according to area, gender, age, and HIV testing status in order to achieve maximum variability.

Summary of findings
The main advantage identified was that HIVST allows for privacy and confidentiality with regard to HIV status, and does not require a visit to a health facility. However, respondents predominantly males, were concerned about the lack of counseling involved, which they thought could lead to suicide ideation among testers. HIVST was found to be acceptable among the majority of respondents, however, there is still a need for follow-up services for self-testers.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
HIVST was found to be acceptable among the majority of respondents (n=n/a).

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
Some respondents expressed the importance of follow-up services for HIV positive self-testers, and liked the suggestion of a counseling hotline.

Source

Study status
Completed