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Anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV-positive results through self-testing among gay and bisexual men


Author
Martinez et al.

Publication year
2014

Country
USA

Type of approach
Facility-based

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
84

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
Qualitative study on anticipated and real reactions to HIV self-testing, including a positive self-test result. Study involved (1) pre-screening questions, (2) participants being asked hypothetical questions (prior to self-testing), and (3) participants being asked questions after they (and a partner) self-tested for HIV (this was over a 3-month period and with a supply of HIVST kits). Interviews were analysed using qualitative methods..

Summary of findings
None of the participants tested HIV-positive, however 7 of their partners did. Participants reported that they provided emotional support and linked their partners to support services. Threee key themes emerged when participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to an HIV-positive self-test result: (1) managing emotional distress, (2) obtaining HIV medical care, and (3) postponing sexual activity. When participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to a partner's HIV-positive self-test result, five themes emerged: (1) provide emotional support; (2) refrain from engaging in sex with casual partner; (3) avoid high-risk sexual activity with both main and casual partners; (4) seek medical services; and (5) obtain a confirmatory test result.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
n/a

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed