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Adolescents' experience of a rapid HIV self-testing device in youth-friendly clinic settings in Cape Town South Africa: a cross-sectional community based usability study


Author
Smith et al.

Publication year
2016

Country

Type of approach
Dual

Type of assistance
Directly assisted

Specimen
Fingerstick/whole blood

Study population
Young people: Adolescents and young adults (16-25 years old)

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
224

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
19.2 [18.4 - 20.0]

Methodology
The study enrolled young adult participants who self-presented at the clinic. A health-care professional demonstrated use of HIVST (directly-assisted approach) and then participants completed the self-test in the presence of the health-care professional (observed testing) who rated the participant's accuracy. After self-testing, participants provided feedback on acceptability and usability of the product.

Summary of findings
Overall, fidelity was high; 216 (96.4%) participants correctly completed the test and read and interpreted the HIV test result. There were eight (3.6%) user errors; six participants failed to prick their finger even though the lancet fired correctly. These participants correctly completed the test and read their results correctly on a second attempt. There were two user errors where participants failed to use the device correctly by breaking the device capillary tube and not filling the capillary tube. Participants rated acceptability and usability highly, with debut testers giving significantly higher ratings for both. Younger participants gave significantly higher ratings of acceptability.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
Participants rated acceptability and usability highly, with debut testers giving significantly higher ratings for both. Younger participants gave significantly higher ratings of acceptability.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed