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Acceptability of three novel HIV prevention methods among young male and transgender female sex workers in Puerto Rico


Author
Giguere et al.

Publication year
2016

Country
USA

Type of approach
n/a

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Mixed: Key population and young people: young male and transgender sex workers

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
12

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
To be eligible for the study, participants had to be male or transgender female, between the ages of 18 and 30 years old, have had anal intercourse at least once in the prior month, have had unprotected anal intercourse in the prior year, and have received or exchanged money, goods, or favors for sexual services in the past two months. Particpants completed a baseline behavioral questionnaire with quantiative measures as well as in-depth qualitative interviews and assessments of participants' preferences on HIVST, pre-exposure prophylaxis, and rectal microbicides. Participants were given a description of an oral fluid based HIV test and shown pictures of the HIVST kit to elicit participants' responses. Participants did not self-test in this study.

Summary of findings
Participants found HIVST highly acceptable for their own use as well as with clients. Challenges to using the HIV self-test with clients included the potential for breach of confidentiality, confronting violent situations, and handling a positive result in the presence of a client. All said they would not have sex with a client who had positive results. Participants were also interested in a rectal microbicide gel that they could use with clients and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, but were concerned about side effects.

Acceptability
0.68

Acceptability details
Participants were very open to using rapid HIVST kits, and all but one reported being likely to use such a test on themselves. Seven of the 12 participants (68%) reported being likely to use them to test clients.

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
Participants discussed how testing themselves in front of clients could be dangerous if they had a positive result.

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a


Study status
Completed