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Acceptability and feasibility of oral fluid-based HIVST among MSM and transgender women in Thailand


Author
n/a

Publication year

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Both

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men and transgender women

Study design
Feasibility/acceptability

Sample size
1671

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
Acceptability and feasibility of oral HIV self-testing (HIVST) amongst men who have sex with men and transgender women in Thailand. 462 men who have sex with men and 462 transgender women were enrolled in the feasibility and acceptability study. In the oral HIVST performance study, 747 men who have sex with men and transgender women were enrolled. In the performance study, participants self-tested and were also tested at a community-based clinic for comparison.

Summary of findings
For men who have sex with men, 79% found assisted HIV self-testing (HIVST) acceptable and 20% found unassisted HIVST acceptable. Transgender women found assisted HIVST acceptable (93%, n=n/a), but not unassisted HIVST (7%, n=n/a). 12% (43/365) of men who have sex with men received a reactive result using assisted HIVST, 12% (11/91) using unassisted HIVST. 9% (38/431) of transgender women received a reactive result using assisted HIVST and none (0%, 0/30) using unassisted HIVST. Out of 747 participants who received both oral HIVST and blood tests according to the national algorithm, there were three discordant results.

Acceptability
0.93

Acceptability details
For men who have sex with men, 79% found assisted HIVST acceptable and 20% found unassisted HIVST acceptable. Transgender women found assisted HIVST acceptable (93%, n=n/a), but not unassisted HIVST (7%, n=n/a).

Willingness to pay
n/a

Willingness to pay details
n/a

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
Out of 747 participants who received both oral HIVST and blood tests according to the national algorithm, there were three discordant results.

Social harm
No social harms were reported among participants who selected assisted or unassisted HIV self-testing (HIVST). Participants were called by counsellors within 48 hours after self-testing regardless of the results. Only minor manifestations were reported, such as anxiety, fears, and depression as seen usually among people accessing HIV testing services. Two reactive participants reported suicidal ideation within 48 hours after testing and were successfully managed by counselors via phone, but these were not considered serious events.

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
57% of participants reported linking to confirmatory testing and 70% reported linking to CST services.

Source
n/a

Study status
Ongoing