Search HIVST

Acceptability and ease of use of home self-testing for HIV among men who have sex with men


Author
Katz et al.

Publication year
2012

Country
USA

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
Directly assisted

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Key population: Men who have sex with men

Study design
Trials

Sample size
133

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)
0.2 [0.2 - 0.2]

Methodology
This study evaluated the acceptability of HIVST at baseline within a randomized controlled trial. Post-test surveys described home self-testing experiences and ease of use.

Summary of findings
Of 133 enrolled subjects, 84% reported that access to self-testing would increase how often they test for HIV. Almost half (46%) reported that the most they would pay for a self-test was US$20, 26% would pay US$20-40, 17% would pay US$40, and 11% would only use one if it were free. How often men thought they would use a home self-test varied by the cost; 86% expected to test 4 times per year if kits cost US$5 compared to 26% if kits cost US$50. 68 subjects were randomized to self-testing and followed for a median of 10 months (IQR 6-12). These men received a kit at baseline, and 45 (66%) requested additional kits (1-5 per subject, 100 total). 43 men completed 69 surveys about testing at home. Subjects reported that the kit was very easy to use in 66 (96%) of these surveys and somewhat easy to use in the other 3. The 24-hour contact was used only to request new kits. All subjects reported non-reactive tests (by post-test surveys or when requesting new kits) except 1 reactive, 2 invalid, 2 misplaced, 1 incorrectly performed, and 2 damaged tests. Men who have sex with men (MSM) were willing to use a rapid antibody test on oral fluids to test themselves at home, found it easy to use, and required little counseling or technical support. These results demonstrate that access to HIV self-testing could increase HIV testing frequency among MSM, but this may depend on the cost of the test.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
Of 133 enrolled subjects, 84% reported that access to self-testing would increase how often they test for HIV.

Willingness to pay
US$ 20

Willingness to pay details
Almost half (46%) reported that the most they would pay for a home self-test was US$20, 26% would pay US$20-40, 17% would pay US$40, and 11% would only use one if it were free.

Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
n/a

HIV positivity
n/a

Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
2 participants had HIV reactive tests: [1] search confirmatory testing and care immediately [2] search confirmatory testing and care after 2 months.