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A qualitative explanation of social network influence on men's HIV testing behavior in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania: implications for increasing HIV testing and promoting HIV self-testing among men


Author
Conserve et al.

Publication year
2017

Country

Type of approach
Community-based

Type of assistance
n/a

Specimen
Oral-fluid

Study population
Other: Vulnerable population: men

Study design
Values and preferences

Sample size
23

UNAIDS HIV prevalence (2017)

Methodology
Qualitative study exploring the process through which injunctive norms (behave how others approve) towards HIV testing are established among men. Men attending social gathering places and previously identified with a low rate of testing, were interviewed and information was coded using pre-structured categories: (a) motivators for encouraging camp members to test for HIV, (b) approach camp members use to encourage each other to test, and (c) outcomes of encouraging HIV testing.

Summary of findings
23 men were interviewed, motivators for encouraging one another for testing was the motivation and information about their own HIV testing experience. Other reasons were knowing a camp member living with HIV and having concerns for camp members who have either had multiple sexual partners or had unprotected sex with a HIV negative/positive sexual partner. Strategies for encouraging others to get tested for HIV testing included engaging in conversations, both formal and informal (invoking humor) and accompanying friends to the clinic. The encouragement to test for HIV was well received by most camp members, increased their awareness about HIV testing, and influenced them to seek HIV testing, with some returning to share their HIV-negative/positive test results with other camp members. This encouragement allowed using familiar, conversational language (go to test to know if you are sick) rather than medical language (we don't say HIV). Others who were encouraged but did not test mentioned the fear of being diagnosed with HIV, stigma, and lack privacy at clinic as barriers. Although HIV self-testing (HIVST) awareness was low, men reported that HIV self-testing can remove some of the HIV testing barriers for their network members.

Acceptability
n/a

Acceptability details
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Willingness to pay
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Willingness to pay details
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Sensitivity
n/a

Specificity
n/a

Concordance
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HIV positivity
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Accuracy details
n/a

Social harm
n/a

Linkage to prevention, care and treatment
n/a